Blonde Review Exploiting Marilyn Monroe for Old Times Sake

Blonde Review Exploiting Marilyn Monroe for Old Times Sake

Blonde Review Exploiting Marilyn Monroe for Old Times Sake

Review of Blonde: Exploiting Marilyn Monroe for Old Times’ Sake

She was an actress of exceptional talent. But once again a director is more interested in examining her body than getting inside her mind (literally, in this case). Given all the indignities and horrors Marilyn Monroe endured during her 36 years—her family tragedies, absent parents, maternal abuse, time in orphanages, time in foster homes, spells of poverty, Incompetent movie roles, insults about her intelligence, struggles with mental illness, substance abuse problems, sexual assault, the slavish attention of unsatisfied fans — it’s a relief that she’s “Blonde.” ” will not have to suffer from the obscenity of , the latest necrophiliac entertainment to exploit.

Hollywood has always eaten its own, including its Murray. Given that the industry has always liked to make films about its machinery, it is not surprising that it also likes to make films about its victims and martyrs. Three years ago in the biopic “Judy,” Renee Zellweger played Judy Garland near the end of her troubled life. “Blonde” goes for a more comprehensive biopic sweep — it runs nearly three hours — adopting a darkly familiar pace that begins with Monroe’s unhappy childhood, her brilliant but slowly fading fame, her revisits her desperate abusive relationship, myriad health problems, and devastating fallout.

After a brief prologue that introduces Marilyn at the height of her fame, the film shifts to a sad, lonely little girl named Norma Jean, with a terrifying, mentally unstable single mother, Gladys (Julianne Nicholson). Is. Childhood is a horror show — Gladys is cold, violent — but Norma Jean crawls into adulthood (penalty if Ana de Armas is overwhelmed). She models for Cheesecake magazine, and before breaking into the film industry, which is another nightmare. Soon after she steps in, she is raped by a man, here called Mr. Z and apparently based on Darryl F. Zanuck, the longtime head of 20th Century Fox studios, where Monroe became a star.

Blonde Review Exploiting Marilyn Monroe for Old Times Sake

“Blonde” 2000 Joyce Carol Otis Hefty (original hardback is 738 pages) based on a fictional account of Monroe’s life. In the novel, Otis draws from the historical record but also plays with the facts. She develops a crush on Monroe and channels his apparitions, including during a passionate tryst with a ruthless President John F. Kennedy. In the book’s introduction, critic Eileen Showalter writes that Oates uses Monroe as an “icon of twentieth-century America.” A woman, Showalter later added without much conviction, “who was much more than a victim.” “Blonde” writer-director, Andrew Dominick, doesn’t seem to have read the part about Monroe. His Norma Jane – and his charming, troubled creation, Marilyn Monroe – is nothing more than a victim: as the years pass and even as her fame grows, she is repeatedly abused, Even by those who claim to love him. A victim of swaggering men and a curiosity for smiling women (unlike Monroe, this Marilyn has no female friends), she is aware of her influence on others but is powerless to do anything about it. With her wry smile, she drifts and stumbles through a life that never quite feels like her own.

What is missing from this portrait is everything else, including Monroe’s personality and inner life, her intelligence, her wit and prudence and perseverance; his interest in—and knowledge of—politics; The work she did as an actress and the true depth of her professional ambitions. (As Anthony Summers points out in his book “Goddess: The Secret Life of Marilyn Monroe,” she created her own corporation: Marilyn Monroe Productions, Inc.) Most, however, have no idea that Monroe was just another What made it better than a beautiful woman? In Hollywood: His Genius. Watching “Blonde,” I wondered if Dominique had actually seen a Marilyn Monroe movie, seeing the transcendent talent, the brilliant comedic timing, the phrasing, the gestures and the grace?

Fictional histories play with truth, hence the hedges that filmmakers maintain about films, that they are “inspired” or “based” on truth. “Blonde” doesn’t advertise itself as fiction yet, though it does have a generally funny disclaimer in the credits. But of course it’s all about Monroe, one of the most famous women of the 20th century, and it revisits her fame and life — played by Bobby Cannale, a character based on Joe DiMaggio. and Adrien Brody on Arthur Miller — with enough fidelity to suggest. that Dominic is acting in good faith when he is just exploiting her anew. The first image of Marilyn in “Blonde” is of her ass makes this clear. The film opens with a brief black-and-white sequence in which Monroe recreates the most famous scene from Billy Wilder’s 1955 comedy “The Seven Year Itch,” about a married man who Aspires to play Monroe from Neighbor. During the movie, heThe character stands on the bushes of the subway and coos like a goose. The wind twice excited her pleated white dress, exposing her thighs. “The Seven Year Itch” only bares her legs, though apparently the large crowd that watched the scene during the shoot noticed. As camera flashbulbs pop, the screen fades to white, Dominique shows a few fleeting images of the crowd and then cuts away. Blues to Marilyn like her dress. Her back is to the camera—the framing of the shot cuts away from most of her head and legs—and she’s leaning forward slightly, so that her butt is pressed toward the viewer, as if inviting. Dominique turns to reveal her face, which is beaming as she points at Marilyn in apparent prayer to the camera. The high contrast of the images makes the blacks look bottomless (metaphor alert!) while the whites are so bright that they threaten to wash out.

For the rest of “Blonde,” Dominique keeps metaphorically peeking at Marilyn’s dress and not, while he tries to adapt his filmmaking to his subject: he uses different aspect ratios and switches between color and black and white (he made movies. Both); reproduces some of his most indelible images; And now and again uses some digital magic, as when a bed turns into a waterfall during a passionate play with two lovers, which happens when Marilyn creates “Niagara”. In other words, time and time again, Dominic blurs the line between his films and his life.

But by so insistently erasing the divisions between these realms, Dominique reduces Marilyn to the very image—goddess, sexpot, pinup, commodity—that he, too, seeks to critique. Her Marilyn has none, just tears and trauma and sex, lots and lots of sex. It’s a surprising move, though, especially when he takes us inside Marilyn’s vagina — twice (!), once in color and once in black and white — while she’s having an abortion. . I’m still not sure if this is meant to represent her cervix or the fetal perspective, which are also visible. It’s definitely not Marilyn’s.

Review of Blonde: Exploiting Marilyn Monroe for Old Times’ Sake

Blonde Review Exploiting Marilyn Monroe for Old Times Sake

Considering all the humiliations and horrors that Marilyn Monroe endured in her 36 years – her family tragedies, father’s absence, mother’s abuse, time in orphanages, time in foster homes, spells of poverty, film Incompetent characters, insults to his intelligence, struggles with mental illness. , substance abuse problems, sexual abuse, sleazy attention from avid fans — it’s a relief that he didn’t have to deal with the obscenity of “Blonde,” the latest form of entertainment to exploit him.

Hollywood has always eaten its own, including the dead. Given that the industry has always loved to make movies about its machines, it’s no surprise that it also loves to make movies about its victims and martyrs. Three years earlier, in the biopic Judy, Renee Zellweger played Judy Garland near the end of her troubled life. “Blonde” is about a more comprehensive autobiography — running about three hours — spanning a darkly familiar pace that begins with Monroe’s unhappy childhood, her brilliant but quickly fraught fame, her examines a depressing violent relationship, numerous health problems and a devastating downward spiral.

After a brief prologue that introduces Marilyn at the height of her fame, the film returns to a sad, lonely little girl named Norma Jeane, accompanied by a terrifying, mentally unstable single mother, Gladys ( Julian Nicholson). Childhood is a horror show – Gladys is cold, cruel – but Norma Jean crawls into adulthood (a well-rounded, if overworked Anna D’Armes). She models for Cheesecake magazine before breaking into the film industry, which is another nightmare. Shortly after stepping onto the lot, she is raped by a man called Mr. Z and apparently based on Daryl F. Zanuck, the longtime head of the 20th Century Fox studio where Monroe became a star. was

“Blonde” is a fictionalized account of Monroe’s life based on the 2000 major novel by Joyce Carol Oates (the original hardcover was 738 pages). In the novel, Oates draws on the historical record, but also plays with facts. She develops a trace of Monroe and channels her apparitions, including during a terrifying encounter with the ill-fated President John F. Kennedy. In the book’s introduction, critic Eileen Showalter writes that Otis uses Monroe as an “icon of twentieth-century America.” A woman, Showalter later added without much conviction, “who was much more than a victim.


Why was Marilyn Monroe popular in the 50s?


Marilyn Monroe was an American actress, model and singer. Known for playing the role of the comical “blonde bombshell”, she became one of the most popular sex symbols of the 1950s and early 1960s and symbolized the era’s sexual revolution.

Blonde Review Exploiting Marilyn Monroe for Old Times Sake


Why was Marilyn influential?


Monroe became the second woman in American history to own her own production company.

“He broke the mold and that of Hollywood studios”challenged the authoritarian structures that dictated the films that would make their stars,” Layton writes. She was an outspoken advocate for equality and talent.


Who inherited Marilyn Monroe’s wealth?


Marilyn Monroe’s plan illustrates what can happen when you fail to control who inherits your estate. The famous actress and model died in August 1962, leaving the bulk of her estate to her acting coach Lee Strasburg.


How old would Marilyn Monroe be today?

The Hollywood icon died on August 4, 1962 at the age of 36, but if she had been alive in 2022, she would have been 96, the same age as Queen Elizabeth II. At the time, the coroner’s toxicology report stated that Marilyn Monroe died as a result of acute barbiturate poisoning.

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